Past

A List of Fifths

So you’ve had a little time to introduce youself to fifths–that is, the sound you make when you play two notes together, the 1st note of a scale (think of it as ‘doh’) and the 5th note of a scale (that’d be ‘soh’).  And you’re good with the idea that we call the distance from doh to soh ‘a fifth’.  Of course this all started with us talking about what it takes to sketch out a chord.

Since you’ve been working out fifths you’ve probably already got a lot if this, but I thought I’d lay it out for you.  The note on the left is doh, the note on the right is soh (up a fifth from doh).  Play the two together and you’re playing a fifth.

First the straightforward starting notes and their 5th above;

C—>G

D—>A

E—>B

F—>C

G—>D

A—>E

B—>F-sharp

And just in case you want to get more adventurous;

B-flat—>F

E-flat—>B-flat

A-flat—>E-flat

D-flat—>A-flat

F-sharp—>C-sharp

C-sharp—>G-sharp

G-sharp—>D-sharp

Of course if you’re ahead of the game you’ll know that C-sharp and D-flat are the same note, and A-flat is that same as G-sharp.  To save a little confusion I’d think of the notes going up like this;

C…C-sharp…D…D-sharp…E…F…F-sharp…G…G-sharp…A…A-sharp…B…C

And think of the notes going down like this;

C…B…B-flat…A…A-flat…G…G-flat…F…E…E-flat…D…D-flat…C

(Notice again that there’s nothing in between an E-note and an F-note.  Likewise there’s nothing between a B-note and a C-note)

But mostly I wanted to make sure you had the fifths working out okay.  Take a bit more time getting a few more of those fifths sorted out, then we’ll move that sketching out a chord thing ahead a bit more.

Have fun.